Holy Week in Chartres (5): Jesus on the Cross

The crucifixion of Jesus is a horrible thing to contemplate. The cross was often shown as  green in the thirteenth century, because Jesus’ death also brought life. On this day of sorrow, I am trying to hold the paradox of life-death in my mind, heart, and body with gratitude and peace.

Tabernacle de Saint Aignan, Chartres Cathedral by Jill K H Geoffrion

My Prayer:

Jesus, I am so sorry. And so grateful.

Tabernacle de Saint Aignan, Chartres Cathedral by Jill K H Geoffrion
Adam depicted under the cross catching the blood of Jesus. This symbolizes how Christ overcame sin.

Scriptural Touchstone: 

The soldiers brought Jesus to the place called Golgotha (which means the place of a skull). And they offered him wine mixed with myrrh; but he did not take it. And they crucified him. Mark 15:22

Tabernacle de Saint Aignan, Chartres Cathedral by Jill K H Geoffrion
The hand of God above Jesus on the Cross. The sculpture is missing, but the halo and outline remain.

Jesus bore our sins in his body on the cross, so that, free from sins, we might live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed. 1Peter 2:24  (Both NRSV)

Invitation To Pray:

Tabernacle de Saint Aignan, Chartres Cathedral by Jill K H Geoffrion
The ciborium with consecrated hosts from the Maundy Thursday service inside the Tabernacle

As you contemplate what Jesus’ death on the cross means to you, what prayers are emerging in your body, mind, heart, and imagination? Pray them now.

Photos: The thirteenth century Tabernacle of Saint Aignan at the Chartres Cathedral in France. It is used exclusively on Maundy Thursday night for the Vigil in the crypt.

Tabernacle de Saint Aignan, Chartres Cathedral by Jill K H Geoffrion
Heart shapes and leaves (symbolizing life) on the top of the tabernacle.

Other posts in this series:

Holy Week in Chartres (1): Palm Sunday
Holy Week in Chartres (2): Mary Prepares Jesus for His Death
Holy Week in Chartres (3): The Blessing of the Oils
Holy Week in Chartres (4): Jesus’ Last Meal with His Disciples

 

Advertisements

Jill K H Geoffrion

Serving Christ as a contemplative minister and artist by compassionately and creatively inspiring others to seek a deeper relationship with God and a more meaningful life of service.

3 comments

Submit a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s